Class

An Integer object represents an integer value.

You can create an Integer object explicitly with:

You can convert certain objects to Integers with:

An attempt to add a singleton method to an instance of this class causes an exception to be raised.

What's Here

First, what's elsewhere. Class Integer:

Here, class Integer provides methods for:

Querying

  • allbits?

    Returns whether all bits in self are set.

  • anybits?

    Returns whether any bits in self are set.

  • nobits?

    Returns whether no bits in self are set.

Comparing

  • <

    Returns whether self is less than the given value.

  • <=

    Returns whether self is less than or equal to the given value.

  • <=>

    Returns a number indicating whether self is less than, equal to, or greater than the given value.

  • == (aliased as ===)

    Returns whether self is equal to the given value.

  • >

    Returns whether self is greater than the given value.

  • >=

    Returns whether self is greater than or equal to the given value.

Converting

  • ::sqrt

    Returns the integer square root of the given value.

  • ::try_convert

    Returns the given value converted to an Integer.

  • % (aliased as modulo)

    Returns self modulo the given value.

  • &

    Returns the bitwise AND of self and the given value.

  • *

    Returns the product of self and the given value.

  • **

    Returns the value of self raised to the power of the given value.

  • +

    Returns the sum of self and the given value.

  • -

    Returns the difference of self and the given value.

  • /

    Returns the quotient of self and the given value.

  • <<

    Returns the value of self after a leftward bit-shift.

  • >>

    Returns the value of self after a rightward bit-shift.

  • []

    Returns a slice of bits from self.

  • ^

    Returns the bitwise EXCLUSIVE OR of self and the given value.

  • ceil

    Returns the smallest number greater than or equal to self.

  • chr

    Returns a 1-character string containing the character represented by the value of self.

  • digits

    Returns an array of integers representing the base-radix digits of self.

  • div

    Returns the integer result of dividing self by the given value.

  • divmod

    Returns a 2-element array containing the quotient and remainder results of dividing self by the given value.

  • fdiv

    Returns the Float result of dividing self by the given value.

  • floor

    Returns the greatest number smaller than or equal to self.

  • pow

    Returns the modular exponentiation of self.

  • pred

    Returns the integer predecessor of self.

  • remainder

    Returns the remainder after dividing self by the given value.

  • round

    Returns self rounded to the nearest value with the given precision.

  • succ (aliased as next)

    Returns the integer successor of self.

  • to_f

    Returns self converted to a Float.

  • to_s (aliased as inspect)

    Returns a string containing the place-value representation of self in the given radix.

  • truncate

    Returns self truncated to the given precision.

  • /

    Returns the bitwise OR of self and the given value.

Other

  • downto

    Calls the given block with each integer value from self down to the given value.

  • times

    Calls the given block self times with each integer in (0..self-1).

  • upto

    Calls the given block with each integer value from self up to the given value.


Constants


The version of loaded GMP.

Class Methods


Returns the integer square root of the non-negative integer n, which is the largest non-negative integer less than or equal to the square root of numeric.

Integer.sqrt(0)       # => 0
Integer.sqrt(1)       # => 1
Integer.sqrt(24)      # => 4
Integer.sqrt(25)      # => 5
Integer.sqrt(10**400) # => 10**200

If numeric is not an Integer, it is converted to an Integer:

Integer.sqrt(Complex(4, 0))  # => 2
Integer.sqrt(Rational(4, 1)) # => 2
Integer.sqrt(4.0)            # => 2
Integer.sqrt(3.14159)        # => 1

This method is equivalent to Math.sqrt(numeric).floor, except that the result of the latter code may differ from the true value due to the limited precision of floating point arithmetic.

Integer.sqrt(10**46)    # => 100000000000000000000000
Math.sqrt(10**46).floor # => 99999999999999991611392

Raises an exception if numeric is negative.

No documentation available

Instance Methods


Returns self modulo other as a real number.

For integer n and real number r, these expressions are equivalent:

n % r
n-r*(n/r).floor
n.divmod(r)[1]

See Numeric#divmod.

Examples:

10 % 2              # => 0
10 % 3              # => 1
10 % 4              # => 2

10 % -2             # => 0
10 % -3             # => -2
10 % -4             # => -2

10 % 3.0            # => 1.0
10 % Rational(3, 1) # => (1/1)

Integer#modulo is an alias for Integer#%.

Bitwise AND; each bit in the result is 1 if both corresponding bits in self and other are 1, 0 otherwise:

"%04b" % (0b0101 & 0b0110) # => "0100"

Raises an exception if other is not an Integer.

Related: Integer#| (bitwise OR), Integer#^ (bitwise EXCLUSIVE OR).

Performs multiplication:

4 * 2              # => 8
4 * -2             # => -8
-4 * 2             # => -8
4 * 2.0            # => 8.0
4 * Rational(1, 3) # => (4/3)
4 * Complex(2, 0)  # => (8+0i)

Raises self to the power of numeric:

2 ** 3              # => 8
2 ** -3             # => (1/8)
-2 ** 3             # => -8
-2 ** -3            # => (-1/8)
2 ** 3.3            # => 9.849155306759329
2 ** Rational(3, 1) # => (8/1)
2 ** Complex(3, 0)  # => (8+0i)

Performs addition:

2 + 2              # => 4
-2 + 2             # => 0
-2 + -2            # => -4
2 + 2.0            # => 4.0
2 + Rational(2, 1) # => (4/1)
2 + Complex(2, 0)  # => (4+0i)

Performs subtraction:

4 - 2              # => 2
-4 - 2             # => -6
-4 - -2            # => -2
4 - 2.0            # => 2.0
4 - Rational(2, 1) # => (2/1)
4 - Complex(2, 0)  # => (2+0i)

Returns int, negated.

Performs division; for integer numeric, truncates the result to an integer:

 4 / 3              # => 1
 4 / -3             # => -2
 -4 / 3             # => -2
 -4 / -3            # => 1

For other +numeric+, returns non-integer result:

 4 / 3.0            # => 1.3333333333333333
 4 / Rational(3, 1) # => (4/3)
 4 / Complex(3, 0)  # => ((4/3)+0i)

Returns true if the value of self is less than that of other:

  1 < 0              # => false
  1 < 1              # => false
  1 < 2              # => true
  1 < 0.5            # => false
  1 < Rational(1, 2) # => false

Raises an exception if the comparison cannot be made.

Returns self with bits shifted count positions to the left, or to the right if count is negative:

n = 0b11110000
"%08b" % (n << 1)  # => "111100000"
"%08b" % (n << 3)  # => "11110000000"
"%08b" % (n << -1) # => "01111000"
"%08b" % (n << -3) # => "00011110"

Related: Integer#>>.

Returns true if the value of self is less than or equal to that of other:

1 <= 0              # => false
1 <= 1              # => true
1 <= 2              # => true
1 <= 0.5            # => false
1 <= Rational(1, 2) # => false

Raises an exception if the comparison cannot be made.

Returns:

  • -1, if self is less than other.

  • 0, if self is equal to other.

  • 1, if self is greater then other.

  • nil, if self and other are incomparable.

Examples:

1 <=> 2              # => -1
1 <=> 1              # => 0
1 <=> 0              # => 1
1 <=> 'foo'          # => nil

1 <=> 1.0            # => 0
1 <=> Rational(1, 1) # => 0
1 <=> Complex(1, 0)  # => 0

This method is the basis for comparisons in module Comparable.

Returns true if self is numerically equal to other; false otherwise.

1 == 2     #=> false
1 == 1.0   #=> true

Related: Integer#eql? (requires other to be an Integer).

Integer#=== is an alias for Integer#==.

Returns true if the value of self is greater than that of other:

  1 > 0              # => true
  1 > 1              # => false
  1 > 2              # => false
  1 > 0.5            # => true
  1 > Rational(1, 2) # => true

Raises an exception if the comparison cannot be made.

Returns true if the value of self is greater than or equal to that of other:

1 >= 0              # => true
1 >= 1              # => true
1 >= 2              # => false
1 >= 0.5            # => true
1 >= Rational(1, 2) # => true

Raises an exception if the comparison cannot be made.

Returns self with bits shifted count positions to the right, or to the left if count is negative:

n = 0b11110000
"%08b" % (n >> 1)  # => "01111000"
"%08b" % (n >> 3)  # => "00011110"
"%08b" % (n >> -1) # => "111100000"
"%08b" % (n >> -3) # => "11110000000"

Related: Integer#<<.

Returns a slice of bits from self.

With argument offset, returns the bit at the given offset, where offset 0 refers to the least significant bit:

n = 0b10 # => 2
n[0]     # => 0
n[1]     # => 1
n[2]     # => 0
n[3]     # => 0

In principle, n[i] is equivalent to (n >> i) & 1. Thus, negative index always returns zero:

255[-1] # => 0

With arguments offset and size, returns size bits from self, beginning at offset and including bits of greater significance:

n = 0b111000       # => 56
"%010b" % n[0, 10] # => "0000111000"
"%010b" % n[4, 10] # => "0000000011"

With argument range, returns range.size bits from self, beginning at range.begin and including bits of greater significance:

n = 0b111000      # => 56
"%010b" % n[0..9] # => "0000111000"
"%010b" % n[4..9] # => "0000000011"

Raises an exception if the slice cannot be constructed.

Bitwise EXCLUSIVE OR; each bit in the result is 1 if the corresponding bits in self and other are different, 0 otherwise:

"%04b" % (0b0101 ^ 0b0110) # => "0011"

Raises an exception if other is not an Integer.

Related: Integer#& (bitwise AND), Integer#| (bitwise OR).

Returns the absolute value of int.

(-12345).abs   #=> 12345
-12345.abs     #=> 12345
12345.abs      #=> 12345

Integer#magnitude is an alias for Integer#abs.

Returns true if all bits that are set (=1) in mask are also set in self; returns false otherwise.

Example values:

0b1010101  self
0b1010100  mask
0b1010100  self & mask
     true  self.allbits?(mask)

0b1010100  self
0b1010101  mask
0b1010100  self & mask
    false  self.allbits?(mask)

Related: Integer#anybits?, Integer#nobits?.

Returns true if any bit that is set (=1) in mask is also set in self; returns false otherwise.

Example values:

0b10000010  self
0b11111111  mask
0b10000010  self & mask
      true  self.anybits?(mask)

0b00000000  self
0b11111111  mask
0b00000000  self & mask
     false  self.anybits?(mask)

Related: Integer#allbits?, Integer#nobits?.

Returns the number of bits of the value of int.

“Number of bits” means the bit position of the highest bit which is different from the sign bit (where the least significant bit has bit position 1). If there is no such bit (zero or minus one), zero is returned.

I.e. this method returns ceil(log2(int < 0 ? -int : int+1)).

(-2**1000-1).bit_length   #=> 1001
(-2**1000).bit_length     #=> 1000
(-2**1000+1).bit_length   #=> 1000
(-2**12-1).bit_length     #=> 13
(-2**12).bit_length       #=> 12
(-2**12+1).bit_length     #=> 12
-0x101.bit_length         #=> 9
-0x100.bit_length         #=> 8
-0xff.bit_length          #=> 8
-2.bit_length             #=> 1
-1.bit_length             #=> 0
0.bit_length              #=> 0
1.bit_length              #=> 1
0xff.bit_length           #=> 8
0x100.bit_length          #=> 9
(2**12-1).bit_length      #=> 12
(2**12).bit_length        #=> 13
(2**12+1).bit_length      #=> 13
(2**1000-1).bit_length    #=> 1000
(2**1000).bit_length      #=> 1001
(2**1000+1).bit_length    #=> 1001

This method can be used to detect overflow in Array#pack as follows:

if n.bit_length < 32
  [n].pack("l") # no overflow
else
  raise "overflow"
end

Returns the smallest number greater than or equal to self with a precision of ndigits decimal digits.

When the precision is negative, the returned value is an integer with at least ndigits.abs trailing zeros:

555.ceil(-1)  # => 560
555.ceil(-2)  # => 600
-555.ceil(-2) # => -500
555.ceil(-3)  # => 1000

Returns self when ndigits is zero or positive.

555.ceil     # => 555
555.ceil(50) # => 555

Related: Integer#floor.

Returns a 1-character string containing the character represented by the value of self, according to the given encoding.

65.chr                   # => "A"
0..chr                   # => "\x00"
255.chr                  # => "\xFF"
string = 255.chr(Encoding::UTF_8)
string.encoding          # => Encoding::UTF_8

Raises an exception if self is negative.

Related: Integer#ord.

Returns an array with both a numeric and a big represented as Bignum objects.

This is achieved by converting numeric to a Bignum.

A TypeError is raised if the numeric is not a Fixnum or Bignum type.

(0x3FFFFFFFFFFFFFFF+1).coerce(42)   #=> [42, 4611686018427387904]

Returns 1.

Returns an array of integers representing the base-radix digits of self; the first element of the array represents the least significant digit:

12345.digits      # => [5, 4, 3, 2, 1]
12345.digits(7)   # => [4, 6, 6, 0, 5]
12345.digits(100) # => [45, 23, 1]

Raises an exception if self is negative or base is less than 2.

Performs integer division; returns the integer result of dividing self by numeric:

  4.div(3)      # => 1
  4.div(-3)      # => -2
  -4.div(3)      # => -2
  -4.div(-3)      # => 1
  4.div(3.0)      # => 1
  4.div(Rational(3, 1))      # => 1

Raises an exception if +numeric+ does not have method +div+.

Returns a 2-element array [q, r], where

q = (self/other).floor    # Quotient
r = self % other          # Remainder

Examples:

11.divmod(4)              # => [2, 3]
11.divmod(-4)             # => [-3, -1]
-11.divmod(4)             # => [-3, 1]
-11.divmod(-4)            # => [2, -3]

12.divmod(4)              # => [3, 0]
12.divmod(-4)             # => [-3, 0]
-12.divmod(4)             # => [-3, 0]
-12.divmod(-4)            # => [3, 0]

13.divmod(4.0)            # => [3, 1.0]
13.divmod(Rational(4, 1)) # => [3, (1/1)]

Calls the given block with each integer value from self down to limit; returns self:

a = []
10.downto(5) {|i| a << i }              # => 10
a                                       # => [10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5]
a = []
0.downto(-5) {|i| a << i }              # => 0
a                                       # => [0, -1, -2, -3, -4, -5]
4.downto(5) {|i| fail 'Cannot happen' } # => 4

With no block given, returns an Enumerator.

Returns true if int is an even number.

Returns the Float result of dividing self by numeric:

4.fdiv(2)      # => 2.0
4.fdiv(-2)      # => -2.0
-4.fdiv(2)      # => -2.0
4.fdiv(2.0)      # => 2.0
4.fdiv(Rational(3, 4))      # => 5.333333333333333

Raises an exception if numeric cannot be converted to a Float.

Returns the largest number less than or equal to self with a precision of ndigits decimal digits.

When ndigits is negative, the returned value has at least ndigits.abs trailing zeros:

555.floor(-1)  # => 550
555.floor(-2)  # => 500
-555.floor(-2) # => -600
555.floor(-3)  # => 0

Returns self when ndigits is zero or positive.

555.floor     # => 555
555.floor(50) # => 555

Related: Integer#ceil.

Returns the greatest common divisor of the two integers. The result is always positive. 0.gcd(x) and x.gcd(0) return x.abs.

36.gcd(60)                  #=> 12
2.gcd(2)                    #=> 2
3.gcd(-7)                   #=> 1
((1<<31)-1).gcd((1<<61)-1)  #=> 1

Returns an array with the greatest common divisor and the least common multiple of the two integers, [gcd, lcm].

36.gcdlcm(60)                  #=> [12, 180]
2.gcdlcm(2)                    #=> [2, 2]
3.gcdlcm(-7)                   #=> [1, 21]
((1<<31)-1).gcdlcm((1<<61)-1)  #=> [1, 4951760154835678088235319297]
An alias for to_s

Since int is already an Integer, this always returns true.

Returns the least common multiple of the two integers. The result is always positive. 0.lcm(x) and x.lcm(0) return zero.

36.lcm(60)                  #=> 180
2.lcm(2)                    #=> 2
3.lcm(-7)                   #=> 21
((1<<31)-1).lcm((1<<61)-1)  #=> 4951760154835678088235319297
An alias for %
An alias for succ

Returns true if no bit that is set (=1) in mask is also set in self; returns false otherwise.

Example values:

0b11110000  self
0b00001111  mask
0b00000000  self & mask
      true  self.nobits?(mask)

0b00000001  self
0b11111111  mask
0b00000001  self & mask
     false  self.nobits?(mask)

Related: Integer#allbits?, Integer#anybits?.

Returns self.

Returns true if int is an odd number.

Returns the int itself.

97.ord   #=> 97

This method is intended for compatibility to character literals in Ruby 1.9.

For example, ?a.ord returns 97 both in 1.8 and 1.9.

Returns (modular) exponentiation as:

a.pow(b)     #=> same as a**b
a.pow(b, m)  #=> same as (a**b) % m, but avoids huge temporary values

Returns the predecessor of self (equivalent to self - 1):

1.pred  #=> 0
-1.pred #=> -2

Related: Integer#succ (successor value).

Returns the value as a rational. The optional argument eps is always ignored.

Returns the remainder after dividing self by other.

Examples:

11.remainder(4)              # => 3
11.remainder(-4)             # => 3
-11.remainder(4)             # => -3
-11.remainder(-4)            # => -3

12.remainder(4)              # => 0
12.remainder(-4)             # => 0
-12.remainder(4)             # => 0
-12.remainder(-4)            # => 0

13.remainder(4.0)            # => 1.0
13.remainder(Rational(4, 1)) # => (1/1)

Returns self rounded to the nearest value with a precision of ndigits decimal digits.

When ndigits is negative, the returned value has at least ndigits.abs trailing zeros:

555.round(-1)      # => 560
555.round(-2)      # => 600
555.round(-3)      # => 1000
-555.round(-2)     # => -600
555.round(-4)      # => 0

Returns self when ndigits is zero or positive.

555.round     # => 555
555.round(1)  # => 555
555.round(50) # => 555

If keyword argument half is given, and self is equidistant from the two candidate values, the rounding is according to the given half value:

  • :up or nil: round away from zero:

    25.round(-1, half: :up)      # => 30
    (-25).round(-1, half: :up)   # => -30
    
  • :down: round toward zero:

    25.round(-1, half: :down)    # => 20
    (-25).round(-1, half: :down) # => -20
    
  • :even: round toward the candidate whose last nonzero digit is even:

    25.round(-1, half: :even)    # => 20
    15.round(-1, half: :even)    # => 20
    (-25).round(-1, half: :even) # => -20
    

Raises and exception if the value for half is invalid.

Related: Integer#truncate.

Document-method: Integer#size

Returns the number of bytes in the machine representation of int (machine dependent).

1.size               #=> 8
-1.size              #=> 8
2147483647.size      #=> 8
(256**10 - 1).size   #=> 10
(256**20 - 1).size   #=> 20
(256**40 - 1).size   #=> 40

Returns the successor integer of self (equivalent to self + 1):

1.succ  #=> 2
-1.succ #=> 0

Integer#next is an alias for Integer#succ.

Related: Integer#pred (predecessor value).

Calls the given block self times with each integer in (0..self-1):

a = []
5.times {|i| a.push(i) } # => 5
a                        # => [0, 1, 2, 3, 4]

With no block given, returns an Enumerator.

Casts an Integer as an OpenSSL::BN

See `man bn` for more info.

Returns the value of int as a BigDecimal.

require 'bigdecimal'
require 'bigdecimal/util'

42.to_d   # => 0.42e2

See also BigDecimal::new.

Converts self to a Float:

1.to_f  # => 1.0
-1.to_f # => -1.0

If the value of self does not fit in a Float, the result is infinity:

(10**400).to_f  # => Infinity
(-10**400).to_f # => -Infinity

Since int is already an Integer, returns self.

to_int is an alias for to_i.

Since int is already an Integer, returns self.

Returns the value as a rational.

1.to_r        #=> (1/1)
(1<<64).to_r  #=> (18446744073709551616/1)

Returns a string containing the place-value representation of self in radix base (in 2..36).

12345.to_s               # => "12345"
12345.to_s(2)            # => "11000000111001"
12345.to_s(8)            # => "30071"
12345.to_s(10)           # => "12345"
12345.to_s(16)           # => "3039"
12345.to_s(36)           # => "9ix"
78546939656932.to_s(36)  # => "rubyrules"

Raises an exception if base is out of range.

Integer#inspect is an alias for Integer#to_s.

Returns self truncated (toward zero) to a precision of ndigits decimal digits.

When ndigits is negative, the returned value has at least ndigits.abs trailing zeros:

555.truncate(-1)  # => 550
555.truncate(-2)  # => 500
-555.truncate(-2) # => -500

Returns self when ndigits is zero or positive.

555.truncate     # => 555
555.truncate(50) # => 555

Related: Integer#round.

Calls the given block with each integer value from self up to limit; returns self:

a = []
5.upto(10) {|i| a << i }              # => 5
a                                     # => [5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]
a = []
-5.upto(0) {|i| a << i }              # => -5
a                                     # => [-5, -4, -3, -2, -1, 0]
5.upto(4) {|i| fail 'Cannot happen' } # => 5

With no block given, returns an Enumerator.

Returns true if int has a zero value.

Bitwise OR; each bit in the result is 1 if either corresponding bit in self or other is 1, 0 otherwise:

"%04b" % (0b0101 | 0b0110) # => "0111"

Raises an exception if other is not an Integer.

Related: Integer#& (bitwise AND), Integer#^ (bitwise EXCLUSIVE OR).

One's complement: returns a number where each bit is flipped.

Inverts the bits in an Integer. As integers are conceptually of infinite length, the result acts as if it had an infinite number of one bits to the left. In hex representations, this is displayed as two periods to the left of the digits.

sprintf("%X", ~0x1122334455)    #=> "..FEEDDCCBBAA"